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  • Ward Off Hangover: Ring In The New Year With Asparagus

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    Scientists have found chemicals in the vegetable also protect liver cells against toxins. Those planning to ring in the New Year with a drink or two on Monday night could do well to lay on a few asparagus-based party canapes to help them avoid spending the next day recuperating. Experiments on rat and human cells found the minerals and amino acids in asparagus are responsible for easing the severe headaches caused by excessive drinking, as well as relieving stress on the liver.

    But it is most important to serve the leaves, which are usually thrown away, as well as the tender shoots, warns a study published in the Journal of Food Science.

    If you're planning to ring in the New Year with a few celebratory drinks, here's a tip for protecting yourself from paying the hangover price on New Year's Day.

    A study in the Journal of Food Science suggests you should eat some asparagus to ward off the effects of a New Year's Day hangover.

    According to researchers at the Institute of Medical Science and Jeju National University in Korea, an extract of asparagus contains amino acids and minerals that may protect your liver cells against toxins from alcohol. With a better functioning liver, you just may be able to avoid the dreaded New Year's Day hangover.

    The Korean scientists tested an extract of young asparagus leaves and shoots on human and rat liver cells. They found that the asparagus extract significantly alleviated cellular toxicity usually associated with the oxidative stress caused by chronic alcohol use.

    Their results, they believe, provide evidence of

    According to scientists at the Monell Chemical Senses Center most people detect the distinct sulfurous odor in their urine shortly after eating asparagus. But a study published in the journal Chemical Senses determined that some people don’t produce the odor while others produce it but are not able to smell it. It depends on your genes.

    Whether or not you produce the odor, it’s a small price to pay if you want to avoid that awful New Year’s Day hangover.

    Please Read this Article at NaturalBlaze.com

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    michael

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