• Prepping: Half-Equals NO Prepping

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    Individuals were able to weather the storm in conditions ranging from basic temporary self-reliance to minor discomfort and inconvenience. They had a source of food, water, and heat. They had a means to defend themselves if necessary. They did not require supplies after the fact. They were also a distinct minority. Others still believed they were prepared . . . until the storm hit. They had generators but no gas. They had extra food but no way to cook it. They had a well but no way to pump the water. Some had fireplaces with no logs or firewood with nowhere to burn it. The list of half-preparedness is endless but the resulting sum of that half-work is the same – they were not prepared at all.

    In short, being prepared half-way is not being prepared at all.

    As a survivor of the Icepocalypse that recently gripped much of the South in crippling power outages and freezing temperatures, at least three lessons can be deduced from the experience.

    1. A very small minority of people are equipped to deal with an emergency in a competent fashion.
    2. A slightly larger number of people attempt to be prepared but fall short if the emergency persists.
    3. The vast majority of people are wholly unprepared for even a slight disturbance in their usual routine or living conditions.

    While this statement may come as basic common sense to the majority of my usual readers, such observations do bear repeating. Indeed, it is important to remind ourselves of just how unprepared we may be, even though we may be more prepared than most of the rest of the population.

    Many of those who are aware of the possibility of an economic collapse, general war, electrical grid failure, …

    The vast majority of people, however, did not even have the basic material needed to last through a four-hour disturbance in their normal routine. Most had not purchased extra food and water or made plans to heat themselves in some way other than electricity. Nor had they even bothered to fill up their gas tanks the day before the storm. In fact, with the exception of the usual rush to buy milk and eggs (food that will spoil as soon as the power goes out)when a storm approaches, there was not even the shockwave of panicked buyers looking to prepare. Most of the important items like canned goods were still on the shelves the day before the storm.

    Please Read this Article at NaturalBlaze.com

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    michael

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